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Criminalization of Black Children – Race, Gender, and Delinquency in Chicago's Juvenile Justice System, 1899-1945 - North Carolina Scholarship Online
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Criminalization of Black Children: Race, Gender, and Delinquency in Chicago's Juvenile Justice System, 1899-1945

Tera Eva Agyepong

Abstract

In the late nineteenth century, progressive reformers recoiled at the prospect of the justice system punishing children as adults. Advocating that children’s inherent innocence warranted fundamentally different treatment, reformers founded the nation’s first juvenile court in Chicago in 1899. Yet amid an influx of new African American arrivals to the city during the Great Migration, notions of inherent childhood innocence and juvenile justice were circumscribed by race. In documenting how blackness became a marker of criminality that overrode the potential protections the status of “child” cou ... More

Keywords: juvenile justice, Chicago history, black children, legal history, race, criminal justice, mass incarceration, delinquency, Great Migration

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2018 Print ISBN-13: 9781469636443
Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2019 DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469636443.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Tera Eva Agyepong, author
DePaul University