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Criminalization of Black ChildrenRace, Gender, and Delinquency in Chicago's Juvenile Justice System, 1899-1945$
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Tera Eva Agyepong

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469636443

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469636443.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.133) Epilogue
Source:
Criminalization of Black Children
Author(s):

Tera Eva Agyepong

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469636443.003.0006

This chapter gives a brief overview of the impact Illinois’ turn to a punitive form of juvenile justice system had in the decade after the study. This discussion is focused on administrators at the Training School for Girls at Geneva, the Training School for Boys at St. Charles, and the new maximum security prison for boys at the State Reformatory at Sheridan, and their more explicit embrace of new punitive policies in the institution. It also describes the increasingly disproportionate rate at which black children were committed to these institutions. The epilogue ends by tying together the book’s historical narrative and summarizing the ways intersecting notions of childhood, race, gender, and sexuality undergirded juvenile justice practice in Illinois.

Keywords:   Black children, Chicago, juvenile justice system, criminalization, Illinois Training School for Girls at Geneva, Illinois Training School for Boys at St. Charles, State Reformatory at Sheridan, Cook County Juvenile Court delinquency, punitive justice

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