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Working in HollywoodHow the Studio System Turned Creativity into Labor$
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Ronny Regev

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469636504

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469636504.001.0001

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Directing

Directing

Chapter:
(p.76) Chapter Three Directing
Source:
Working in Hollywood
Author(s):

Ronny Regev

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469636504.003.0004

The third chapter explains how directors came to be associated with film authorship. Filmmakers were indeed accorded a level of autonomy and responsibility that was unique in industry terms. This autonomy, however, was limited to the shooting portion of the production process. In other words, directors, even so-called auteurs like George Cukor or William Wyler, had no say over scriptwriting or the editing of the picture. Furthermore, directorial autonomy, the chapter argues, was the product of economic expediency rather than of respect for artistic freedom. In fact, in order to maintain a studio career, directors had to prove they were worthy of this autonomy. They had to demonstrate their conformity and commitment to the studio’s material concerns.

Keywords:   Auteurs, George Cukor, Directors, Filmmakers, William Wyler

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