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Working in HollywoodHow the Studio System Turned Creativity into Labor$
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Ronny Regev

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469636504

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469636504.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

Acting

Acting

Chapter:
(p.108) Chapter Four Acting
Source:
Working in Hollywood
Author(s):

Ronny Regev

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469636504.003.0005

The fourth chapter exposes the experience of screen players and particularly of movie stars. It shows how famous actors such as Clark Gable, Katherine Hepburn, and Joan Crawford were subjected to two seemingly contradictory types of management. On the one hand, together with film extras, character actors, and other creative talent, stars were treated as regimented employees, bound by draconian contracts, which essentially alienated them from their labor. On the other hand, they were safeguarded by the studios, pampered with exorbitant salaries and a network of professionals, who worked day and night in order to make them look and sounds good. The aim of both kinds of treatment was to bind the star to the studio and prevent him or her from ever attempting to cash in on their marketable persona on their own.

Keywords:   Actors, Joan Crawford, Extras, Clark Gable, Katharine Hepburn, Movie Stars

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