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Working in HollywoodHow the Studio System Turned Creativity into Labor$
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Ronny Regev

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469636504

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469636504.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 06 July 2022

Shooting

Shooting

Chapter:
(p.139) Chapter Five Shooting
Source:
Working in Hollywood
Author(s):

Ronny Regev

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469636504.003.0006

The fifth chapter deals with the experience of those who are commonly known as craftsmen or below-the-line workers. It suggests that the division between arts and crafts in the film industry resulted from the history of labor organization and the political struggles between labor unions such as IATSE and the American Society of Cinematographers. In addition, focusing on the experience of cameramen, the chapter demonstrate that workers in the technical branches of filmmaking, were concerned less with control and more with recognition. It shows how directors of photography sought to claim some of the respect and artistic stature accorded to directors and screenwriters. Thus, they struggled to form a tighter bond between the creative status of the film industry and the more traditional craft or technical work they introduced into it.

Keywords:   American Society of Cinematographers, Cameramen, Cinematographers, Craftsmen, Directors of Photography, IATSE

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