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Constructing the Dynamo of DixieRace, Urban Planning, and Cosmopolitanism in Chattanooga, Tennessee$
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Courtney Elizabeth Knapp

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469637273

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469637273.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 12 June 2021

Defying Racist Stereotypes

Defying Racist Stereotypes

The Big Nine and Lincoln Park as Sites of Diasporic Cosmopolitanism

Chapter:
(p.68) Chapter Four Defying Racist Stereotypes
Source:
Constructing the Dynamo of Dixie
Author(s):

Courtney Elizabeth Knapp

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469637273.003.0005

This chapter explores the stereotype-defying histories of Black and multi-ethnic placemaking in two historically significant Black neighborhoods: the Big Nine and Lincoln Park. East Ninth/Martin Luther King Street (““the Big Nine”“) is a corridor which for more than a century served as a premiere destination for African American commerce, social life, and artistic/creative production. Lincoln Park is one of the oldest and most historically significant Black neighborhoods in Chattanooga, described by many locals as Black community’s ““backyard”.

Keywords:   Commercial and economic development, Black or African American placemaking, Public space planning, Cultural development, Sports and recreation planning, Black business development history, Jewish history U.S. South, American blues history, Labor organizing

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