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Racial TaxationSchools, Segregation, and Taxpayer Citizenship, 1869-1973$
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Camille Walsh

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469638942

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469638942.001.0001

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Let Them Plow

Let Them Plow

Beyond the Black-White Paradigm

Chapter:
(p.35) Chapter Two Let Them Plow
Source:
Racial Taxation
Author(s):

Camille Walsh

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469638942.003.0003

Chapter Two examines a handful of pivotal Supreme Court cases brought against school desegregation at the turn of the century and the first few decades of the 20th century. The Cumming v. Georgia case in 1899 indicated a demand for equality on the basis of taxpayer status that was understood by the plaintiffs to be intertwined with race, a demand that was interpreted by the Supreme Court only in the language of taxation and federalism. This chapter also highlights regional variations and a number of cases brought at the height of Jim Crow segregation by people of color who fell outside the black-white paradigm, even if courts then imposed it on them.

Keywords:   School Desegregation, Race, Segregation, Courts, Equality, Taxpayer

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