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Racial TaxationSchools, Segregation, and Taxpayer Citizenship, 1869-1973$
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Camille Walsh

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469638942

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469638942.001.0001

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Taxpayers and Taxeaters

Taxpayers and Taxeaters

Poverty and the Constitution

Chapter:
(p.109) Chapter Six Taxpayers and Taxeaters
Source:
Racial Taxation
Author(s):

Camille Walsh

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469638942.003.0007

Chapter Six focuses on how demands for racial integration in education after Brown also frequently deployed tax-based activism to achieve their ends, from busing cases to the important, though brief, extension of civil rights litigation logic from education to poverty and welfare rights. In this decade the effects of the War on Poverty and welfare activism worked together to generate the first combined race- and class-based equal protection claims. Response to the poverty jurisprudence of the court was largely filtered through the language of taxpayers' rights. Finally, this chapter examines the Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg School District case in 1971 and the response of many angry "taxpaying citizens" at the thought of desegregation and busing. Swann was the high point for the judicial attempt at equalizing educational opportunities, even as the de jure/de facto distinction was beginning to break down.

Keywords:   Busing, War on Poverty, Civil Rights, Equal Protection, De facto Segregation, Desegregation, Constitutional Law

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