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Strangers and Friends at the Welcome TableContemporary Christianities in the American South$
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James Hudnut-Beumler

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469640372

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469640372.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Christian Homeschoolers

Christian Homeschoolers

Chapter:
(p.201) 9 Christian Homeschoolers
Source:
Strangers and Friends at the Welcome Table
Author(s):

James Hudnut-Beumler

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469640372.003.0010

Framed by a visit to the Teach Them Diligently Christian Homeschooling Convention, the largest event of its kind, this chapter explores the large and growing phenomena of Christian homeschooling. Christian homeschooling differs from its secular, alternative lifestyle counterpart by a strong commitment to biblical teachings about family, science, and a concomitant conservative antipathy to so-called “government schooling.” At its oldest and simplest it embraces Anabaptist groups, who offer the most basic lessons to the rest of the community. Ken Hamm, and “young Earth creationists” (who argue for six actual days of creation and a maximum Earth age of 10,000 years are even more influential in the community, as are the Family Research Council, and groups urging women to have as many children as possible for biblical reasons. One of the interesting features of the movement is how many of today’s southern homeschooling parents were themselves the products of an earlier generation of the “Christian academies” devised in the 1960s and 1970s to avoid racial integration. Now that these same academies are mostly integrated, there is some evidence that the contemporary practice of educating one’s children at home (an activity differentially preferred by whites) has the effect of furthering educational segregation.

Keywords:   Homeschooling, Christian Homeschoolers, Educational Segregation, Young Earth Creationism, Teach Them Diligently, Christian academies

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