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Mapping DiasporaAfrican American Roots Tourism in Brazil$
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Patricia de Santana Pinho

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469645322

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469645322.001.0001

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That’s My Face

That’s My Face

African American Reflections on Brazil

Chapter:
(p.23) Chapter One That’s My Face
Source:
Mapping Diaspora
Author(s):

Patricia de Santana Pinho

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469645322.003.0002

This chapter contextualizes African American roots tourism in Brazil both time-wise and space-wise. First, it locates the brief history of African American roots tourism within the longer trajectory of the meanings of Brazil for African Americans, spanning from the late nineteenth century—when, inspired by fantastical imaginings of Brazil as a “racial paradise,” groups of African Americans attempted to migrate there—to the present-day, when the country has become an important roots tourism destination. Second, the chapter compares representations of Brazil with those of other countries frequently visited by African American roots tourists, placing them within a wider system of meanings that the author defines as the “map of Africanness,” a map that is both spatial and temporal.

Keywords:   Bahia, Brazil, African Americans, African Diaspora, Roots Tourism, Diaspora Tourism, Afro-Brazilians, Blackness, Black identity, Black culture

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