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This War Ain't OverFighting the Civil War in New Deal America$
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Nina Silber

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469646541

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469646541.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Stories Retold, Memories Remade

Stories Retold, Memories Remade

Chapter:
(p.35) 2 Stories Retold, Memories Remade
Source:
This War Ain't Over
Author(s):

Nina Silber

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469646541.003.0003

The chapter considers how traditional ways of remembering the Civil War began to shift as fewer of the war’s participants – soldiers and civilians – were still alive. Important new actors helped shape new memories about the war including writers and artists in the New Deal’s Federal Arts programs, the National Park Service (now serving as stewards of many Civil War battlefields), and producers and artists in Hollywood. These new actors gave greater visibility to Civil War stories that had often been overlooked – including John Brown’s antislavery crusade and tales that more explicitly acknowledged racial oppression. Still, Lost Cause themes showed surprising staying power, albeit in ways that were adapted for modern audiences.

Keywords:   Federal Theatre Project, Federal Writers’ Project, United Daughters of the Confederacy, Sterling Brown, Gettysburg National Military Park, Hollywood, So Red the Rose, Gone With the Wind, “Professional Southerner”

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