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Gone HomeRace and Roots through Appalachia$
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Karida L. Brown

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781469647036

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469647036.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Children, and Black Children

Children, and Black Children

Chapter:
(p.75) (p.76) 4 Children, and Black Children
Source:
Gone Home
Author(s):

Karida L. Brown

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469647036.003.0005

This chapter analyzes the emergence of the racial self among this migrant group of “Black Appalachians.” How does a child come to learn that they are a black child? What are the institutions and practices that inform and reinforce one’s understanding of his or her own racialization? What are the ways in which this generation of African Americans affirmed and valued their own lives within the dehumanizing context of Jim Crow? Drawing on the oral history testimony of Brown’s research participants, this chapter offers a phenomenological analysis of the ways in which African American children of that generation experienced, perceived, and made sense of racism, prejudice, and segregation. The chapter argues that while the racial landscape was much different from that of their parents who grew up in post-Reconstruction era Alabama, the structure of feeling that articulates the ‘us and them’ along racial lines is the same.

Keywords:   racial self, black Appalachians, racialization, Jim Crow

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