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Occupied TerritoryPolicing Black Chicago from Red Summer to Black Power$
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Simon Balto

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781469649597

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469649597.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 25 July 2021

Prologue

Prologue

The Promised Land and the Devil’s Sanctum: The Risings of the Chicago Police Department and Black Chicago

Chapter:
(p.13) Prologue
Source:
Occupied Territory
Author(s):

Simon Balto

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469649597.003.0002

The book’s prologue briefly sketches the colonization of Indigenous land that led to Chicago’s founding and rapid urbanization, and then focuses on two important phenomena within that larger story: the origins of policing in the city and the Great Migration of Black Americans that produced the city’s famed “Black Metropolis.” It shows how the Chicago Police Department’s origins lay not in some vague interest in public safety, but rather in controlling labor radicalism and the behavior of European immigrants. It also documents how the promise of Chicago for migrating Black Southerners was often quite different than the reality that they found within the city.

Keywords:   Great Migration, Origins of policing, Labor radicalism, Urbanization, Black Metropolis, Immigrants

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