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These People Have Always Been a RepublicIndigenous Electorates in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, 1598-1912$
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Maurice S. Crandall

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781469652665

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469652665.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 29 July 2021

The Politics of Inclusion/Exclusion in the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands during the Mexican Period

The Politics of Inclusion/Exclusion in the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands during the Mexican Period

Chapter:
(p.139) Chapter Four The Politics of Inclusion/Exclusion in the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands during the Mexican Period
Source:
These People Have Always Been a Republic
Author(s):

Maurice Crandall

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469652665.003.0005

This chapter is an examination of Indigenous responses to changes in the administration of Indian affairs in the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands during the Mexican period. This period was characterized by steady erosion of the mission system, the rupturing of the colonial pact, and the eventual Jesuit Expulsion. While Hopis had minimal contacts with independent Mexico, Yaquis once again revolted in defence of political autonomy, this time under the complicated leadership of Juan Banderas. O’odhams endured chaotic decades of drought, frontier warfare, and administrative changes that resulted in significant mission depopulation and the decline of the town electoral model, although not its complete disappearance. This chapter demonstrates that these three Indigenous nations confronted the electoral-political upheavals of the Mexican period in distinct ways that ensured their survival as sovereign peoples.

Keywords:   Colonial Pact, Indian Citizenship in Mexico, Juan Banderas, Jesuit Expulsion, O’odham Mission Depopulation

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