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Food FightsHow History Matters to Contemporary Food Debates$
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Charles C. Ludington and Matthew Morse Booker

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781469652894

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469652894.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 30 July 2021

The Standard of Taste Debate

The Standard of Taste Debate

How Do We Decide What Tastes Best?

Chapter:
(p.100) 5 The Standard of Taste Debate
Source:
Food Fights
Author(s):

Charles C. Ludington

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469652894.003.0006

On the one hand people like to say that “there is no accounting for taste.” On the other hand, people constantly make judgments about their own and other people’s taste (gustatory and aesthetic). Charles Ludington examines the taste for wine in eighteenth-century England and Scotland, and the taste for beer in twenty-first century America, to argue that taste can in fact be accounted for because it is a reflection of custom, “tribal” identity, gender, political beliefs, and conceptions of authenticity, which are mostly but not entirely conditioned by class status and aspirations. And rightly or wrongly, we judge other people’s taste because taste positions us in society.

Keywords:   Taste, Class, Bordeaux, Wine, Port, Ethnicity, Identity, Authenticity, Beer, distinction

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