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Opening the Gates to AsiaA Transpacific History of How America Repealed Asian Exclusion$
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Jane H. Hong

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781469653365

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469653365.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

Manila Prepares for Independence

Manila Prepares for Independence

Filipina/o Campaigns for U. S. Citizenship on the Eve of Philippine Decolonization

Chapter:
(p.82) Chapter Three Manila Prepares for Independence
Source:
Opening the Gates to Asia
Author(s):

Jane H. Hong

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469653365.003.0003

Drawing from U.S. and Philippine archives, this chapter places Filipina/o advocates in conversation with Filipina/o Americans and their allies in the 1940s campaign to pass a Philippine citizenship bill. Philippine officials took up the legislative cause in order to prepare for what they feared would be the catastrophic financial costs of national independence from U.S. colonial rule. They hoped to cultivate Filipina/o Americans as a reliable source of remittances and other support sent from the United States to the islands. Manila’s role in the Washington-based naturalization campaign thus exemplified Philippine officials’ instrumental understanding of the U.S. citizenship bill as a means to achieve their own national goals. It also reflected their flexible view of national citizenship. Through their support of naturalization rights, Manila officials sought to inculcate in Filipina/o Americans a sense of responsibility to the islands that transcended a formal legal status alone. Viewed from Asia, then, Manila’s campaigning for the Luce-Celler bill can be seen as an act of Philippine state-building intended to safeguard and promote the islands’ economic welfare and stability after independence.

Keywords:   Luce-Celler bill, Filipino American, Manila, Philippine independence, remittance

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