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Those Who Know Don't SayThe Nation of Islam, the Black Freedom Movement, and the Carceral State$
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Garrett Felber

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781469653822

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469653822.001.0001

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The Making of the “Black Muslims”

The Making of the “Black Muslims”

Chapter:
(p.16) Chapter One The Making of the “Black Muslims”
Source:
Those Who Know Don't Say
Author(s):

Garrett Felber

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469653822.003.0002

The idea of the “Black Muslims” as a hate group, or an example of the emergent falsehood of reverse racism, was facilitated and propagated by carceral officials. It was pliable enough that law enforcement could suppress Muslim practice in prisons and police local mosques by claim- ing that the NOI was a subversive political group in the guise of religion while offering civil rights organizations the language to dismiss it within the Black freedom struggle. But this suppression and surveillance often helped grow the organization, and Muslims found creative ways to practice Islam and express Black self-determination and anticolonial solidarity, even in the state’s most repressive spaces.

Keywords:   Islamophobia, Muslim, Black Muslim, Anti-colonialism, Anti-imperialism, Nation of Islam

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