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Uncontrollable BlacknessAfrican American Men and Criminality in Jim Crow New York$
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Douglas J. Flowe

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781469655734

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469655734.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

To Let Her Know That She Did Me Wrong

To Let Her Know That She Did Me Wrong

Illegality, Domestic Authority, and the Politics of Black Intimacy

Chapter:
(p.125) Chapter 4 To Let Her Know That She Did Me Wrong
Source:
Uncontrollable Blackness
Author(s):

Douglas J. Flowe

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469655734.003.0005

Chapter 4 explains how black men might have sought to establish the rights of patriarchy and common concepts of masculinity through the prism of intimate relationships with black women. It explores the belief that black “racial destiny” relied upon strong patriarchal households and domestically focused housewives, and how some working-class black men may have used illegal acts and possibly violence in order to create such households. It also argues that this was ultimately a response to a broader public and economic world that denied them right to realize these ambitions through legitimate means.

Keywords:   Patriarchy, Intimate relationships, Racial destiny, Domestic authority, Masculinity, crime

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