Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Free the LandThe Republic of New Afrika and the Pursuit of a Black Nation-State$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Edward Onaci

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781469656144

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469656144.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

Revolutionary Name Choices

Revolutionary Name Choices

Self-Definition and Self-Determination

Chapter:
(p.79) 3 Revolutionary Name Choices
Source:
Free the Land
Author(s):

Edward Onaci

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469656144.003.0004

This chapter focuses primarily on the ideas behind and the practice of naming. It argues that name choices are the most fundamental form of individual and group self-determination developed by New Afrikans (and Black Power activists more generally). This chapter historicizes black naming practices in the United States, covering their importance from the era of racial slavery to the moments when Nation of Islam and Malcolm X, among others, were helping instil Black pride in mid-twentieth century African Americans. Specifically, it examines the ways that individual and group names, identity, cartography, and orthography became effective tools for the mechanics of liberation struggle. Taken for granted by both the name studies scholarship and histories of the Black Power Movement, this consideration of naming encourages scholars and activists to think more deeply and critically about the value of politically conscious naming practices.

Keywords:   New Afrika, Name choice, Naming, Identity, Nation of Islam, Malcolm X, Self-determination, Lifestyle politics, Activism, Black pride

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .