Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
How the Streets Were MadeHousing Segregation and Black Life in America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Yelena Bailey

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781469660592

Published to North Carolina Scholarship Online: January 2022

DOI: 10.5149/northcarolina/9781469660592.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA PRESS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.northcarolina.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of North Carolina Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in NCSO for personal use.date: 23 May 2022

The Secret of Selling the Negro

The Secret of Selling the Negro

The Creation of Black Urban Consumerism

Chapter:
(p.44) Chapter Two The Secret of Selling the Negro
Source:
How the Streets Were Made
Author(s):

Yelena Bailey

Publisher:
University of North Carolina Press
DOI:10.5149/northcarolina/9781469660592.003.0003

Chapter 2 discusses the history of homeownership as a component of U.S. nationalism and white identity and how government policies led to the creation of a new, racialized market for home goods. Paying specific attention to the impact exclusionary policies had on perceptions of Black consumerism and belonging, this chapter examines the marketing that was aimed at Black urban inhabitants through magazines like Ebony. As the flagship Black magazine of the mid-twentieth century, Ebony reflects the way Black consumerism was cultivated in connection to the streets, often in derogatory ways.

Keywords:   Homeownership, Nationalism, Identity, Policies, Racialized market, Consumerism, Urban, Marketing, Ebony (magazine), Streets

North Carolina Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .